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The temple of Astraea

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metalonmetalblog:

Chintpurni a Sanskrit word means someone who can end the worries, here “Chinta” means worries or tensions and “Purni” means who can end your worries or tension. The Goddess here is believed to save her devotees from worries, tensions and provide them happiness in life, by fulfilling their wishes, so the Goddess is known as CHINTAPURNI. The temple is dedicated to Goddess Chinmastika or Chintapurni. Meaning of Chinmastika is the Goddess without head. The goddess resident in Chintpurni is also known by this name. According to Markandeya Purana, goddess Chandi defeated the demons after a fierce battle but two of her yogini emanations (Jaya and Vijaya) were still thirsty for more blood. Goddess Chandi cut off her own head to quench Jaya and Vijaya’s thirst for more blood. She is usually shown holding her own severed head in her hand, drinking one stream of blood spurting from the arteries in her neck, while at her side are two naked yoginis, each of whom drink blood from different stream.
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metalonmetalblog:

Chintpurni a Sanskrit word means someone who can end the worries, here “Chinta” means worries or tensions and “Purni” means who can end your worries or tension. The Goddess here is believed to save her devotees from worries, tensions and provide them happiness in life, by fulfilling their wishes, so the Goddess is known as CHINTAPURNI. The temple is dedicated to Goddess Chinmastika or Chintapurni. Meaning of Chinmastika is the Goddess without head. The goddess resident in Chintpurni is also known by this name. According to Markandeya Purana, goddess Chandi defeated the demons after a fierce battle but two of her yogini emanations (Jaya and Vijaya) were still thirsty for more blood. Goddess Chandi cut off her own head to quench Jaya and Vijaya’s thirst for more blood. She is usually shown holding her own severed head in her hand, drinking one stream of blood spurting from the arteries in her neck, while at her side are two naked yoginis, each of whom drink blood from different stream.

(Source: wormhole-eater, via blaqmercury)

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In Greek mythology, Astræa or Astrea (Ancient Greek: Ἀστραῖα; English translation: “star-maiden”) was a daughter of Zeus and Themis or of Eos and Astraeus.  She and her mother were both personifications of justice, though Astræa  was also associated with innocence and purity. She is always associated  with the Greek Goddess of justice, Dike, who used to live on Earth but left, sickened by human greed.
Astræa, the celestial virgin, was the last of the immortals to live with humans during the sagacious Bronze Age (the third age, after the Utopian Golden Age and defective Silver Age) in the old Greek religion’s five deteriorating Ages of Man. According to Ovid, Astraea abandoned the earth at the end of the Iron Age. Fleeing from the new wickedness of humanity, she ascended to heaven to become the constellation Virgo; the scales of justice she carried became the nearby constellation Libra, reflected in her symbolic association with Justitia in Latin culture. In the Tarot,  the 8th card, Justice, with a figure of Justitia, can thus be  considered related to the figure of Astræa on historical iconographic  grounds.
According to legend, Astræa will one day come back to Earth, bringing  with her the return of the utopian Golden Age of which she was the  ambassado
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In Greek mythology, Astræa or Astrea (Ancient Greek: Ἀστραῖα; English translation: “star-maiden”) was a daughter of Zeus and Themis or of Eos and Astraeus. She and her mother were both personifications of justice, though Astræa was also associated with innocence and purity. She is always associated with the Greek Goddess of justice, Dike, who used to live on Earth but left, sickened by human greed.

Astræa, the celestial virgin, was the last of the immortals to live with humans during the sagacious Bronze Age (the third age, after the Utopian Golden Age and defective Silver Age) in the old Greek religion’s five deteriorating Ages of Man. According to Ovid, Astraea abandoned the earth at the end of the Iron Age. Fleeing from the new wickedness of humanity, she ascended to heaven to become the constellation Virgo; the scales of justice she carried became the nearby constellation Libra, reflected in her symbolic association with Justitia in Latin culture. In the Tarot, the 8th card, Justice, with a figure of Justitia, can thus be considered related to the figure of Astræa on historical iconographic grounds.

According to legend, Astræa will one day come back to Earth, bringing with her the return of the utopian Golden Age of which she was the ambassado

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